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Cover the canvas with a Raw Umber and White wash
Jacob’s Cherry (Acrylic on canvas) by Karen Winship

The following images take you step by step through the development of a painting as I created it. It shows you how important it is to prepare your canvas with a ‘ground’ or undercoat of colour before you start.

By applying a darker neutral colour it not only prepares your canvas but also acts as a middle tone for your image and a contrast for the background colour. People often ask me why, when the canvas is white, do you paint it a mid tone and then white again? By doing this it gives a more ‘painterly’ effect to your finished piece and without it the image would not look ‘connected’ to your canvas.
If you look closely at the finished Cherry painting you will see that it is based on contrasts; The contrast of the textured background and the smooth surface of the cherry itself; the cool reds in the top half of the cherry contrast with the warmer reds in the bottom half; red’s complimentary colour (opposite on the colour wheel) is green which has been made more vivid on the stalk (using more yellow) and has been used to create the shadow to add a vibrancy to the overall painting.
Prime the canvas with Raw Umber and Titanium White
Nice Pears (Acrylic on canvas) by Karen Winship

This painting shows you glazes being used to build up depth of colour. By applying thin layers of colour mixed with a glazing medium (I use Liquitex gloss glazing medium) you can build colours without them mixing, e.g. yellow over blue won’t give you a flat green colour but a warmer blue. Warning - you should always make sure each layer of glaze is dry before you add another as acrylic can form a skin on the top making you think it is dry when it is actually still wet underneath and can easy come off when disturbed leaving a nasty ‘wound’ effect which can be difficult to fix.
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Landscape development
If you enjoy these step by step slideshows leave me a comment in my guest book and have a go yourself!
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